Thrills & Spills with Timothy Corrigan

Timothy Corrigan
Timothy Corrigan captured our hearts and mood boards while developing Perennials by Timothy Corrigan. Join us as we get to know the man behind the grandiose designs.
Timothy Corrigan working in the studio

Known for his elegantly layered rooms and love of antiques, LA-based designer Timothy Corrigan began working with Perennials in 2018 on his collection, Perennials by Timothy Corrigan, that launched this past August. Corrigan’s aesthetic was quite the departure for Perennials’ typically contemporary designs. His collection of luxury performance fabrics and rugs is filled with intricate patterns inspired by his projects from around the globe, from California to Paris to Italy. We caught up with Corrigan to get his take on everything from maximalism to red wine spills.

In an age where consumers are inundated with minimalism and Scandinavian design trends, what case do you make for maximalism as a livable trend?

If anything, I would say that design trends are actually moving away from minimalism but because design is constantly on a pendulum from one extreme to another, I always advise clients to not adhere too closely to any one particular style. To me, the best-designed homes are those spaces that include a mix of elements from all periods as opposed to feeling like they are a time capsule of a specific period. I love timeless spaces that, first and foremost, are designed to be comfortable and used in multiple ways. The problem with minimalist design in the home is that it doesn’t easily accommodate the elements of daily life: newspapers, laptops, dog toys, etc. These clean, minimalist spaces look great until you add the” stuff” of daily life. That’s why I find it easier to live in a space that is a bit more layered and accepting of the things that we use on a daily basis. I am not recommending Maximalism because that it can be a little overwhelming too…you need to have some clean, open surfaces to put down your things as well. It’s all about finding that happy balance between too little and too much!

Are you ever tasked with designing grandiose homes with more “challenging” details? Like children or entertaining crowds? If so, how do you make these spaces functional?

I have always said that even the most beautifully designed room is not fully successful if it cannot be used with some comfort and ease. No one wants to live in a museum. We always make sure that we are careful about the materials (stone, glass, metals, woods, and fabrics) that we use on a project to make sure that they are appropriate for the way that the room is going to be used. We used Perennials fabric in the private dining room for the King of a country because he has grandchildren and didn’t want to be worried about ruining the fabric. We’ve all been in homes in which the host or hostess expressed concerns about where you put your glass down on the table, etc. The problem with that is that you, as a guest, never really feel comfortable or at home in that kind of environment. For me, the best designed home is one that is comfortable and elegant.

We noticed a lot of global motifs in your Perennials collection. Where around the world provides you with endless design inspiration?

Timothy Corrigan taking a step back to review.

I am very lucky to have lived around the world throughout my life. My earliest years were spent in Mexico and since then I have lived all around the United States and in Europe. My previous career in advertising let me visit just about every country in the world and we have done design projects on five continents so I get a lot of opportunity to travel. This exposure to so many different cultures very much informs a lot of my design aesthetic because I have learned that there is no single “right” way to do just about anything. I love taking inspiration from one place or culture and filtering it through all of my different experiences to create a new design. European, Asian, Latin American and good old American design influences all that I do.

What is your favorite design from your collection with Perennials?

Wow, that’s difficult because the various designs were intentionally created for different purposes; just like the Oscars, I tend to divide elements in a room into two categories Best Leading Actor/Actress and Best Supporting Actor/Actress. Not every item in a room can be the “Star” because you need other pieces to tie the room together and make it all work. So, if you don’t mind I will tell you my favorites in a couple of different categories:

  • Eastern Eden, Go For Baroque and Regal Row rug for the Wow Factor
  • Diamonds are Forever, Ivy League and Jardin rug for the Supporting Players